iPad Sketch Collection 1

By Thursday, July 16, 2015 0 , , Permalink 0

Here are my first three sketches that I have done with my iPad and stylus during my trip to Iran.

I have promised my father to draw one sketch a week and as you see, they are getting better and better. Thanks dad for the energy and passion you have towards my artworks. It makes me so excited and eager to do better and better.

Iran Trip – June to August 2015 – Isfahan Naqsh-e Jahan Square

By Thursday, July 9, 2015 0 , , Permalink 1

Naqsh-e Jahan Square (Persian: میدان نقش جهان‎ Maidān-e Naqsh-e Jahān; trans: “Image of the World Square”), known as Imam Square (میدان امام), formerly known as Shah Square (میدان شاه), is a square situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran.

Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. It is 160 metres (520 ft) wide by 560 metres (1,840 ft) long[1] (an area of 89,600 square metres (964,000 sq ft)).

The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque is situated on the eastern side of this square and at the northern side Keisaria gate opens into the Isfahan Grand Bazaar. Today, Namaaz-e Jom’eh (the Muslim Friday prayer) is held in the Shah Mosque.

Source: Wikipedia

Iran Trip – June to August 2015 – Tangeh Savashi

Tangeh Savashi (Persian: تنگ ساواشی) or Tangeh Vashi (Persian: تنگ واشی) is a gorge and mountain pass in the Alborz range of Iran (Persia). It is a popular tourist attraction in Tehran Province.

Located 15 kilometers west of Firouzkouh, 9 kilometers north of the Firouzkouh-Damavand road in Tehran Province, it is a narrow mountain pass in the Alborz range. The narrow gorge was created by a perennial stream which comes down from a series of waterfalls upstream.

Slightly lower, in a hilly area, the stream provided a patch of lush grazing land within the mountains. Until the 20th century the area was a royal hunting reserve, populated by various wildlife. The Qajar Persia king Fath Ali Shah (1772 – 1834) maintained a hunting lodge there.

To commemorate his hunts, Fath Ali Shah ordered the carving of a relief in the mid way point of the pass. There are ruins of a Qajar guard tower at the top of one of entrances to the gorge.

Today, the relief is a popular tourist attraction and the location is also highly popular among trekking and hiking fans.

Source: Wikipedia